Help improve FTD diagnosis and patient care Learn more.

Help improve FTD diagnosis and patient care Learn more

Physician

Physician

Howard Rosen, MD

Professor of Neurology
Imaging is a powerful tool for understanding what's happening in the brain. As our methods improve, we will rely more and more on this technology.
Dr. Rosen sees patients in the clinic, trains new doctors and conducts research.

Dr. Rosen received his MD from Boston University School of Medicine, trained in internal medicine at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York, and subsequently completed a neurology residency at UCSF. He is board certified in both Internal Medicine and Neurology. After residency, Dr. Rosen pursued fellowship training in brain imaging at the Washington University School of Medicine and then returned to UCSF to join the team at the Memory and Aging Center in 1999.

Dr. Rosen participates in the evaluation of new patients in the MAC clinic as well as the continued management of care for some of these individuals in the continuity clinic. As part of the MAC and the UCSF Department of Neurology, he participates in the training of medical students, residents and fellows. In addition to his clinical responsibilities, Dr. Rosen maintains an active research program.

His primary area of interest is in the organization of the emotional systems in the brain and how these systems are affected in different forms of dementia. His research combines methods of assessing emotional function in the brain with brain imaging in both patients and cognitively normal individuals.

Suzee Lee, MD

Assistant Professor of Neurology
As a clinical fellow, Dr. Lee evaluates and treats patients at the Memory and Aging Center.

Dr. Lee received a BA degree in English from Harvard and an MD degree from McGill University in Montreal, Canada. She then completed an internal medicine internship at Brown University and neurology residency at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, serving as Chief Resident in her final year. Dr. Lee completed a behavioral neurology fellowship at the UCSF Memory and Aging Center. She is a neurologist who evaluates and treats patients at the Memory and Aging Center.

Dr. Lee's research focuses on neuroimaging in atypical dementias, such as corticobasal degeneration and frontotemporal dementia. Her interests also include understanding genetic susceptibility in atypical dementias.

Gil Rabinovici, MD

Attending Neurologist
Accurately diagnosing the cause of dementia can help patients and families plan for the future and is essential for developing new treatments.
Dr. Rabinovici evaluates and treats patients and coordinates the training for new doctors.

Born and raised in Jerusalem, Dr. Rabinovici received his BS degree from Stanford University and MD from Northwestern University Medical School. He completed an internship in internal medicine at Stanford University, neurology residency (and chief residency) at UCSF and a behavioral neurology fellowship at the Memory and Aging Center (MAC).

Dr. Rabinovici participates in patient evaluations and management. On the research front, he leads the MAC PET imaging program and is principle investigator of a cohort study of early-onset Alzheimer’s disease and of Imaging Dementia: Evidence for Amyloid Scanning (IDEAS), a national study sponsored by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to assess the clinical utility of amyloid PET launching in 2016. His work investigates how structural, functional and molecular brain imaging techniques can be used to improve diagnostic accuracy in dementia and to study the biology of neurodegenerative diseases, with the goal of accelerating treatment development. His work investigates how structural, functional and molecular brain imaging techniques can be used to improve diagnostic accuracy in dementia and to study the biology of neurodegenerative diseases, with the goal of accelerating treatment development. Dr. Rabinovici’s work is supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIA and NINDS), the Alzheimer’s Association, the American College of Radiology, the John Douglas French Alzheimer's Foundation, the Tau Consortium, the Association for Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration and Avid radiopharmaceuticals/Eli Lilly. Awards recognizing his work include the 2015 Christopher Clark Award for Advancement of the Field of Amyloid Imaging, the 2012 American Academy of Neurology Research Award in Geriatric Neurology and the 2010 Best Paper in Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging: New Investigator Award from the Alzheimer’s Association.

William Seeley, MD

Professor of Neurology
To understand how a disease of the brain begins, we have to know where it begins. Our work seeks to understand the specific brain cells and circuits first affected by neurodegenerative diseases.
Dr. Seeley participates in patient evaluation and management.

Dr. Seeley attended medical school at the University of California at San Francisco (UCSF), where he first encountered patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) in 1999, during a research elective with Dr. Bruce Miller. He then completed a neurology residency at Harvard Medical School, training at the Massachusetts General and Brigham & Women's Hospitals. Returning to UCSF for a behavioral neurology fellowship, with Dr. Miller, Dr. Seeley developed expertise in the differential diagnosis and treatment of patients with neurodegenerative disease. He is currently an Associate Professor of Neurology at the UCSF Memory and Aging Center, where he participates in patient evaluation and management.

Dr. Seeley’s research in his Selective Vulnerability Research Laboratory concerns regional vulnerability in dementia, that is, why particular dementias target specific neuronal populations. Dr. Seeley addresses this question through behavioral, functional imaging and neuropathology studies. The goal of his research is to determine what makes brain tissues susceptible or resistant to degeneration, with an eye toward ultimately translating these findings into novel treatment approaches.

Victor Valcour, MD

Associate Professor of Geriatric Medicine and Neurology
Soon there will be a large number of older HIV patients. We need more research to direct optimal care.
Dr. Valcour’s main research interest is neurocognition in HIV patients over 60 years of age.

Dr. Valcour is an internist and geriatrician at the Memory and Aging Center at UCSF where he is an Associate Professor of Geriatric Medicine and Neurology. He has completed fellowships in both Geriatric Medicine and Neurobehavior. He completed his medical training at the University of Vermont where he was elected to the Alpha Omega Alpha Medical Honors Society. He completed Internal Medicine residency at St. Joseph Hospital in Denver, Colorado, Geriatric Medicine Fellowship at the University of Hawaii, and a Neurobehavior fellowship at UCSF. He worked as Associate Professor of Geriatric Medicine at the University of Hawaii - Manoa before joining the Memory and Aging Center at UCSF.

Dr. Valcour's main research interest is neurocognition in aging HIV patients. He also completes neuroAIDS research in Bangkok, Thailand. He directed the Hawaii Aging with HIV Cohort of HIV-infected individuals over 50 years of age prior to joining the MAC. This leading HIV-aging neuroAIDS study began to unravel the neuro-epidemiology of aging with HIV. His current work at UCSF focuses on HIV patients over 60 years of age where he is recruiting individuals for a longitudinal cohort study. Nearly 1/2 of his research occurs in Bangkok, Thailand in association with the Southeast Asia Research Collaboration with Hawaii (SEARCH). Here his primary work relates to HIV DNA as a marker for dementia.

Maria Luisa Gorno-Tempini, MD, PhD

Neurologist
Dr. Gorno-Tempini is an attending physician at the MAC and researches progressive aphasia.

Dr. Gorno-Tempini obtained her medical degree and clinical specialty training in neurology in Italy. Her main focus was in behavioral neurology, particularly the neural basis of higher cognitive functions such as language and memory. To pursue this research she worked for three years at the Function Imaging Laboratory, University College London, where she obtained her PhD in imaging neuroscience. She was part of the language group and her thesis work consisted of several Positron Emission Tomography (PET) and functional MRI studies investigating the neural basis of face and proper name processing.

She came to the Memory and Aging Center at UCSF in 2001 and her main research project concerns progressive aphasia. Her goal is to combine neuropsychological and imaging techniques to characterize the various language deficits that can be early symptoms of different forms of dementia.

Mary De May, MD

Associate Clinical Professor of Neurology
The Memory and Aging Center provides the ideal environment in which to bridge the fields of psychiatry and neurology.
Dr. De May is a geriatric psychiatrist and Hellman Master Clinician at the Memory and Aging Center.

Dr. Mary De May received her medical degree from the State University of New York at Stony Brook. She completed an internship in medicine and psychiatry at the University of Pennsylvania in Philadelphia and subsequently did her psychiatry residency and fellowship at the University of Pittsburgh Western Psychiatric Institute and Clinic. She joined the UCSF Memory and Aging Center in 2000, where she is the Center's Hellman Master Clinician.

As an attending physician at the Memory and Aging Center Clinic, Dr. De May participates in the multidisciplinary, comprehensive evaluation of new patients and research participants, as well as providing ongoing care. She teaches neurology residents and fellows, psychiatry interns, geriatric medicine fellows and other rotating clinicians. She also performs psychiatric evaluations for patients referred from within the Memory and Aging Center and helps them find appropriate psychiatric care within the community as needed.

Adam Boxer, MD, PhD

Professor of Neurology
I am cautiously optimistic about new, effective treatments for dementia.
Dr. Boxer directs studies of new therapeutic agents for Alzheimer’s disease and frontotemporal dementia.

Dr. Boxer received his MD and PhD degrees as part of the NIH-funded Medical Scientist Training Program at New York University Medical Center. He completed an internship in Internal Medicine at California Pacific Medical Center and a residency in Neurology at Stanford University Medical Center. He completed a fellowship in behavioral neurology at UCSF.

Dr. Boxer is a Professor of Neurology and the Vera and John Graziadio Scholar in Alzheimer’s Disease Research. He directs the Alzheimer’s Disease and Frontotemporal Dementia Clinical Trials Program at the Memory and Aging Center. He participates in the evaluation and management of patients in the Memory and Aging Clinic and attends on the Moffitt Inpatient Neurology Service.

Dr. Boxer’s research uses quantitative eye movement (watch a video on this study) and neuroimaging (MRI and PET) measurements to study the pathophysiology of cognitive and motor impairments in normal aging, mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer’s disease, frontotemporal lobar degeneration, progressive supranuclear palsy (PSP) and corticobasal degeneration. He is the lead principle investigator of the first US multicenter, randomized, placebo-controlled, clinical trial of a therapeutic agent for frontotemporal dementia (memantine/Namenda®) and an international, phase 2/3, randomized, placebo-controlled trial of the microtubule stabilizing agent, davunetide (NAP, Al-108), for PSP. Dr. Boxer is the recipient of the 2002 Edwin Boldrey Award from the San Francisco Neurological Society, the 2005 John Douglas French Foundation Alzheimer’s Award and a 2009 Hellman Foundation Scientist Award.

Bruce L. Miller, MD

Director & Professor of Neurology
We used to think dementias hit the brain diffusely. We now realize that if one part of the brain is compromised, another part can remodel and become stronger.
Dr. Miller is the clinical director of the Memory and Aging Center at UCSF.

Dr. Miller is Professor of Neurology at the University of California at San Francisco (UCSF) where he holds the A.W. & Mary Margaret Clausen Distinguished Chair. Dr. Miller is the director of the Memory and Aging Center (MAC) at UCSF, which is funded through the State of California, the National Institutes of Health (NIH), and the Larry L. Hillblom Foundation, amongst others. Dr. Miller has received many awards including the Potamkin Award from the American Academy of Neurology, the Raymond Adams Lecture at the American Neurological Association, and the Elliot Royer Award from the San Francisco Neurological community.

The busy UCSF dementia center links comprehensive patient evaluations to basic research in neuropsychology, neuropsychiatry, neuroimaging and genetics. Dr. Miller's goal is the delivery of model care to all of the patients who enter the clinical and research programs at the MAC.

Dr. Miller is a behavioral neurologist with a special interest in brain and behavior relationships and has focused his work in the area of dementia. He has many years of experience directing pharmaceutical trials for patients with Alzheimer's disease and directed the UCSF treatment trial for Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease with quinacrine in conjunction with Drs. Stanley Prusiner and Michael Geschwind. He is a leader in consortia focused around developing treatments for progranulin and tau disorders.

At UCSF, Dr. Miller directs an NIH-funded program project on frontotemporal dementia (FTD) called Frontotemporal Dementia: Genes, Images and Emotions. His work with FTD has emphasized both the behavioral and emotional deficits that characterize these patients, while simultaneously noting the visual creativity that can emerge in the setting of FTD. The recognition that dementia patients have many strengths is a guiding principle of the Memory and Aging Center.

Dr. Miller is author of the recent books The Human Frontal Lobes and The Behavioral Neurology of Dementia, and has extensive publications regarding dementia diagnosis and treatment. For nearly two decades, Dr. Miller has been the scientific director for the philanthropic organization The John Douglas French Alzheimer’s Foundation. He is actively involved in patient care at the UCSF clinics and hospital and teaches extensively in the medical school. Dr. Miller runs the Behavioral Neurology Fellowship at UCSF. He was featured on The PBS NewsHour.