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Neurobehavioral Rotation Program

The UCSF Memory and Aging Center offers one-month rotations for senior medical students, residents and fellows that include an intense clinical experience, exposure to clinical research programs and formal didactic lectures. Rotator supervision and evaluation is provided by Howard Rosen, MD, Georges Naasan, MD and David Perry, MD.

Application process

While the rotation is required for UCSF neurology and psychiatry residents, it is open to other UCSF residents and fellows. UCSF medical students are welcome to apply for the elective in their senior year through Cha Viloria in the Curricular Affairs office (415-476-8084).

Non-UCSF neurology residents may also apply for an elective rotation provided they have a US or Canadian medical license, malpractice insurance and health insurance. This is a 30-day monthly rotation beginning on the first day of the month. Please review the learning objectives for the one-month elective at the Memory and Aging Center and then complete the Program Application.


Visiting Scholars

Visiting scholars are physicians, psychologists or other medical professionals who wish to observe in our clinic or potentially collaborate in ongoing research projects at the UCSF Memory and Aging Center (MAC). Visiting scholars are often from abroad and funded by their home institutions during their time at the MAC. Visiting scholars are not required to have a US medical license and are not permitted to evaluate patients on their own; however they are welcome to observe our clinic and clinical research evaluations. Please note that observation in clinic is limited to 1–2 days per week. Applicants are expected to have excellent English speaking and reading skills.

Clinical observerships are available for up to three months, with a minimum of one month recommended. Applicants interested in research are recommended to stay for at least six months. For clinical observation visits less than three months, a B visa is required. For visits of three months or longer, J1 visas are required and will be sponsored through UCSF. The cost for a J1 visa up to one year is $380, and for one year and longer it is $550; visa costs are paid to the UC Regents following your arrival. Additionally, there is an administrative fee for visiting scholars of $300/month with a one-time $35 ID badge charge. Candidates who demonstrate a strong interest or track record of leadership in dementia research or clinical work may apply for a limited number scholarships, consisting of waving the monthly $300 administrative fees. For those interested in applying for this scholarship, please indicate so in your cover letter and briefly explain your accomplishments and future goals.

The first step is to complete the Program Application. Please submit completed applications via email to vsmac@memory.ucsf.edu. The application deadline is 3 months before the applicant’s preferred start date. We ask that applicants begin their visit on the first of the month. Once the application has been reviewed, we will contact you.

In addition to the program application, those interested in applying for research are required to submit a five-page research proposal that outlines your research question and hypotheses, summarizes relevant literature and the significance of the proposed research, and includes methods and specific planned analyses.

For further inquiries, please contact vsmac@memory.ucsf.edu.


Behavioral Neurology Training Program

The UCSF Behavioral Neurology Training Program (BNTP) is a two-year program designed to prepare neurologists to pursue a research career in behavioral neurology. The BNTP is certified by the United Council on Neurologic Specialties (UCNS). Fellow supervision and evaluation is provided by the Program Director (Bruce Miller, MD) and Co-Director (Howard Rosen, MD), in addition to a research advisor chosen by the trainee.

Training occurs primarily through the multidisciplinary UCSF Memory and Aging Center (MAC) dedicated to improving diagnosis and treatment of cognitive and behavioral disorders resulting from neurodegenerative disease. As part of the UCSF Department of Neurology, which has over 80 faculty members, the MAC maintains strong collaborative relationships with other clinical programs (including the epilepsy and neuromuscular disease subspecialty groups) and with basic scientists ranging from molecular biologists to cognitive neuroscientists both at UCSF and other Bay Area institutions. Research conducted through the MAC utilizes many techniques including extensive clinical assessments, experimental paradigms gleaned from neuroscience and psychology, functional and structural neuroimaging, gene expression studies and proteomics. These techniques are applied to many clinical populations including patients with mild cognitive impairment, Alzheimer’s disease, frontotemporal dementia and Parkinsonian dementias. This stimulating, diverse clinical and research environment gives trainees a broad exposure to current research relevant to behavioral neurology and access to a wide variety of research mentors.

The first year focuses on building expertise in three areas:

  1. Principles of brain-behavior correlation
  2. Clinical manifestations of brain disorders affecting cognition and behavior, in particular neurodegenerative diseases
  3. Development of clinical skills for evaluation of cognitive and behavioral abnormalities, including interpretation of neuropsychological and behavioral data.

Clinical experience at the MAC is supplemented with weekly didactic conferences and rotations through the major clinical research venues.

During the second year, minimal clinical exposure continues (about 1 day per week), with the rest of the time being devoted to research.

Application process

Applicants for the Behavioral Neurology Training Program must have completed a residency in neurology, psychiatry, or other relevant specialty and have a license to practice medicine in the United States.

Please send your completed Program Application to BNTP@memory.ucsf.edu. Program applications are due by April 30 of each year. After review of the applications, qualified candidates will be invited to interview with members of the training program and learn more about the clinical and research environment at UCSF.

For more information, please call (415) 476-5591 or email us.


Neuropsychology Training Program

The UCSF Neuropsychology Training Program in the Department of Neurology provides both postdoctoral and pre-doctoral training in neuropsychology.

Training occurs primarily through the UCSF Memory and Aging Center (MAC), a multidisciplinary group dedicated to improving diagnosis and treatment of cognitive and behavioral disorders resulting from neurological disease, in particular neurodegenerative disorders. In addition to a large clinical service, we have research programs that focus on healthy aging, mild cognitive impairment, frontotemporal lobar disorders, and Alzheimer’s disease. As part of the UCSF Department of Neurology, which has over 80 faculty members, the MAC maintains strong collaborative relationships with other clinical programs and with basic scientists in areas ranging from molecular biology to cognitive neuroscience at UCSF and other Bay Area institutions. The Neuropsychology Training Program shares resources with the Behavioral Neurology Training Program, a certified program designed to prepare neurologists for research careers in behavioral neurology.

Postdoctoral training

The Neuropsychology Postdoctoral Training Program is a two-year program designed to provide research and clinical training in neuropsychology in a behavioral neurology setting.

Most postdoctoral fellows divide their time evenly between research and clinical activities, although the program is flexible enough to adapt to each individual trainee’s needs. Research conducted through the MAC utilizes comprehensive clinical assessments, experimental paradigms gleaned from neuroscience and psychology, functional and structural neuroimaging, gene expression studies, and proteomics. This stimulating, diverse clinical and research environment gives trainees a broad exposure to current research relevant to academic and clinical neuropsychology. An extensive research infrastructure provides statistical and database support and considerable access to well-characterized patient populations. Trainees have the opportunity to work collaboratively within established research studies or carry out individually-initiated research. Additional information regarding potential research topics can be found in the research section.

The MAC sees over 1000 new patients per year and follows 2000 patients annually through clinic and an NIH-funded Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center. Postdoctoral fellows receive extensive clinical training carrying out brief neuropsychological evaluations in a multidisciplinary setting and are exposed to a broad spectrum of adult behavioral neurology disorders. Cases are reviewed in detail at the multidisciplinary clinical case conferences. An optional rotation in a general neuropsychological assessment clinic in the Department of Psychiatry is also available for additional clinical training.

Didactic training includes a weekly neuropsychology seminar, weekly MAC journal club, weekly MAC research seminar, weekly cognitive neuroscience seminar, and periodic Huntington’s and frontotemporal dementia teaching cases, clinical-pathological case conferences, neurology grand rounds and several other UCSF seminars of potential interest. Postdoctoral fellows are also invited to provide supervision for pre-doctoral neuropsychology trainees rotating through the MAC.

Application process

Applicants are asked to provide a CV, a one-page description of their research interests and three letters of support prior to being considered for an interview. After review of the application, suitable candidates will be invited to interview with members of the training program and learn more about the clinical and research environment at UCSF. Materials can be sent by email to jkramer@memory.ucsf.edu or regular mail to:
Joel Kramer, PsyD
UCSF Memory and Aging Center
350 Parnassus Ave., Suite 905
San Francisco, CA 94143-1207
Dr. Kramer can be reached by email or phone at (415) 476-7561.

Pre-Doctoral Training

The UCSF Department of Neurology offers a part-time pre-doctoral practicum placement for clinical psychology graduate students. The practicum typically involves 16 hours per week of clinical training, although additional hours are available. An additional 8 hours per week as a paid research assistant can also be negotiated.

The pre-doctoral training can be divided evenly between two rotations, with 5-6 months at the Memory and Aging Center (Supervisor: Joel Kramer, PsyD, ABPP) and 5-6 months at the UCSF Epilepsy Center (Supervisor: Deborah Cahn-Weiner, PhD, ABPP-CN). Clinical training opportunities and didactics at the Memory and Aging Center are the same as those offered in the Postdoctoral Training Program. In the Epilepsy Center, students gain experience carrying out in-depth neuropsychological evaluations with a broad range of patients with seizure disorders, including pre- and post-surgery assessments, Wada procedures and intra-operative brain mapping.

Application process

Applicants are asked to provide a CV, a brief description of their professional goals and interests, and three letters of support prior to being considered for an interview. After review of the application, suitable candidates will be invited to interview with Drs. Cahn-Weiner and Kramer. Materials should be sent by email to jkramer@memory.ucsf.edu or regular mail to:
Joel Kramer, PsyD
UCSF Memory and Aging Center
350 Parnassus Ave., Suite 905
San Francisco, CA 94143-1207


Grand Rounds

As part of its commitment to ongoing educational and professional development, the UCSF Memory and Aging Center hosts weekly seminars intended for academics in the Department of Neurology. These Friday seminars feature guest speakers from around the world and our own neurologists, neuropsychologists and cognitive neuroscientists discussing current and upcoming research including topics such as brain and behavior, neuropathology, dementia and cognition.


Conferences

  • Rapidly Progressive Dementia and Subacute Encephalopathies: The University of California, San Francisco, Department of Neurology hosted a one-day conference in November 2010 of some of the leading experts in rapidly progressive dementia (RPD) to introduce participants to the latest cutting-edge diagnostic techniques and provide a diagnostic algorithm for RPD. Conference details
  • Bridging Cultures: Improving Evaluation and Treatment of Cognitive Disorders: This one-day conference in 2008 had a morning science track titled Taking Action: Cognitive Disorders Research and Care in Underserved Populations. The afternoon caregiver track was Providing Support: Focus on Asian-Pacific Islander Caregivers, and this session was presented in English with Chinese interpretation services provided to those who wanted it. Conference details
  • FTD 2006: 5th International Conference on Frontotemporal Dementia: The 5th International Conference on Frontotemporal Dementia was a three-day conference with one full day devoted to caregivers, family members and interested laypersons, as well as three days of scientific sessions. Topics included the molecular basis of FTD, animal models, behavioral manifestations, diagnostic testing and biomarker assessments including neuroimaging and genetics. Conference details

March 26, 2014