Jessica Foley, PhD, ABPP-CN

Clinical Neuropsychologist

Dr. Jessica M. Foley is a board-certified clinical neuropsychologist and Assistant Clinical Professor of Neurology who has served within the Memory and Aging Center of the UCSF Department of Neurology since 2014. Dr. Foley was awarded a bachelor’s degree from Harvard University in 2002, followed by PhD and PsyD degrees from Nova Southeastern University (2007) with a specialization in clinical neuropsychology. She completed predoctoral internship training specializing in neuropsychology at Brown Medical School Department of Psychiatry and postdoctoral fellowship training in neuropsychology at the UCLA Semel Institute for Neurosciences and Human Behavior. She previously (2009–2014) served as Neuropsychologist and Instructor of Psychiatry within the Harvard Medical School Department of Psychiatry and the Boston VA Medical Center, where she functioned as the senior neuropsychologist within the Brockton division (specialized in the assessment of medically complex older adults). She also served as faculty within the Boston Consortium in Clinical Psychology and Training Leader for neuropsychology training within the geropsychology internship and fellowship programs.

Dr. Foley currently functions as an attending neuropsychologist within the Memory and Aging Center, in which capacity she serves a multidisciplinary team and performs neuropsychological evaluations for patients presenting with suspicion of neurodegenerative illness. She also performs comprehensive neuropsychological evaluations of adults with a variety of known or suspected neurologic illnesses through the Department of Neurology Adult Outpatient Neuropsychology Clinic. Dr. Foley also serves as a faculty mentor for neuropsychology students in training, supporting clinical and research skills among developing scientist-practitioners in clinical neuropsychology.

Dr. Foley’s primary research interest concerns preclinical detection of Alzheimer’s disease and other neurodegenerative conditions by exploring genetic, metabolic, and cognitive factors that predict brain white matter deterioration. An additional interest entails understanding factors that moderate cognitive and white matter changes in older adults with HIV-infection.