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Emmeline Chuu

Research Coordinator

Emmeline received a bachelor of arts degree in biology from Reed College in Portland, Oregon, where she completed her senior research thesis in molecular cell biology, focusing on estrogen-mediated regulation of gene expression. Emmeline joined Dr. Adam Boxer’s clinical trials team at the UCSF Memory and Aging Center in December of 2013 and is the primary study coordinator for a Phase I Alzheimer’s disease (AD) treatment trial.

Publications

A selection of the abstracts and manuscripts published using EXAMINER data.

The publications listed on this page are a selection of the articles published that used the EXAMINER battery. If you wish to look for more, you can search PubMED, which is maintained by the National Library of Medicine, or Google Scholar.

Manuscripts

  1. Kramer, J.H. (2014). Special Series Introduction: NIH EXAMINER and the Assessment of Executive Functioning. Journal of the International Psychological Society, 20(1), 8-10. doi: 10.1017/S1355617713001185

Panos Theofilas, PhD

Postdoctoral Scholar

Panos Theofilas is a postdoctoral fellow in the research group of Dr. Grinberg at UCSF Memory and Aging Center since 2012. His research focus is on neuropathological changes and susceptibility of subcortical brain regions in the earliest stages of Alzheimer's disease (AD). His project takes advantage of the great availability of elderly controls from the Brain Bank of the Brazilian Aging Study Group and UCSF Neurodegenerative Disease Brain Bank in order to characterize the susceptibility of brainstem nuclei in AD. Dr. Theofilas’ research methodology includes analysis of different components of human brain circuitries as a whole by combining unbiased stereology, immunohistochemistry/biochemical assays and making use of advanced 3D computer graphics for histological volume reconstructions. His academic background include a BSc degree in zoology and a MSc degree in neuroscience from the University of Edinburgh in the UK. He completed his doctorate degree at Bonn University in Germany on programmed cell death signaling pathways in animal models of temporal lobe epilepsy and acquired expertise in stereotaxic brain surgery and molecular biology techniques.

Alzheimer’s Disease Trial of Levetiracetam

The purpose of this study is to evaluate whether levetiracetam reduces subclinical (clinically silent) seizure activity and/or improves cognition in a subset of people with Alzheimer’s disease (AD) who exhibit epileptiform activity.

Summary

  • Study director: Keith Vossel, MD, MSc
  • Sponsor: Alzheimer’s Association, Inc.; NIH National Institute on Aging; S.D. Bechtel, Jr. Foundation
  • Recruiting?: Feb 2014 (estimated)
  • Official study title: A Phase 2A Levetiracetam Trial for Alzheimer’s Disease—Associated Network Hyperexcitability
  • ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT02002819

Software FAQ

Read through our list of commonly asked questions about running the EXAMINER tasks or using the R Scoring Program.

Questions and Answers for Running Tasks

Q: The program either freezes, or I get errors. What's wrong?
A: Make sure you are using the correct version of PschoPy, 1.73.05. The easiest way to do this is to install from the CD in two steps: Install version 1.73.02 using the provided installer file; and then, use the built-in updater to update to version 1.73.05 using the provided file. Both files are provided on the CD in the same folder. DO NOT use the auto-update feature.

Q: I'm still getting errors. What should I do?

Mild to Moderate Alzheimer’s Disease Trial with TPI-287

Tau is a microtubule-associated protein, and abnormal tau function has been proposed to play a role in the development and progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). TPI-287 is an stabilizer of microtubule dynamics, and the stabilization of microtubules is hypothesized to compensate for the loss of tau function in AD. The purpose of this study is to determine the dose of TPI-287 that is safe and tolerable in people with mild to moderate AD, as well as to measure the properties and preliminary efficacy of TPI-287.

Summary

  • Study director: Adam Boxer, MD, PhD
  • Sponsor: UCSF (Funder: Alzheimer’s Association)
  • Recruiting?: Yes
  • Official study title: A Phase I, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Sequential Cohort, Dose-Ranging Study of the Safety, Tolerability, Pharmacokinetics, Pharmacodynamics, and Preliminary Efficacy of TPI-287 in Patients with Mild to Moderate Alzheimer’s Disease

Sophie Lin

Research Coordinator

Sophie joined Dr. Adam Boxer’s clinical trials team at the UCSF Memory and Aging Center in 2013. Sophie is the primary study coordinator for a several clinical trials.

Mild Alzheimer’s Disease Trial of Solanezumab

The production and deposition of amyloid plaques in the brain is thought to contribute to the development and progression of Alzheimer’s disease (AD). Solanezumab is hypothesized to reduce accumulation of amyloid plaques and thus slow the progression of AD. The primary purpose of the study is to determine if Solanezumab will slow cognitive and functional decline in participants with mild AD.

Summary

  • Study director: Adam Boxer, MD, PhD
  • Sponsor: Eli Lilly and Company
  • Recruiting?: Yes
  • Official study title: Effect of Passive Immunization on the Progression of Mild Alzheimer’s Disease: Solanezumab (LY2062430) Versus Placebo
  • ClinicalTrials.gov identifier: NCT01900665
  • Conditions studied: Mild Alzheimer's disease

Anesthesia

The risk of cognitive decline related to surgery and anesthesia continues to be debated in the scientific literature. Some animal studies suggest that anesthesia may worsen the development of the plaques and tangles associated with Alzheimer’s disease while others identify the surgical procedure itself to be a problem by causing inflammation and release of harmful proteins. Others attribute temporary or permanent cognitive changes to the medications used to manage pain or other complications of being hospitalized. Ultimately, although this is a very active area of research, there are no definitive studies in older humans that prove a causative effect on the brain from anesthesia or provide recommendations on specific choices of anesthesia. Despite this, we hope to be able to identify information that may help our patients with cognitive problems evaluate the risk and make informed choices about surgery and anesthesia.

The risk of cognitive decline related to surgery and anesthesia continues to be debated in the scientific literature. Some animal studies suggest that anesthesia may worsen the development of the plaques and tangles associated with Alzheimer’s disease while others identify the surgical procedure itself to be a problem by causing inflammation and release of harmful proteins. Others attribute temporary or permanent cognitive changes to the medications used to manage pain or other complications of being hospitalized.

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