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Raquel C. Gardner, MD

Assistant Professor

Dr. Gardner completed her bachelor's degree in neuroscience and behavior at Columbia University in New York. She received her medical degree from Harvard University. She completed her internship in internal medicine and residency in neurology at UCSF. She then joined the UCSF Memory and Aging Center in 2012 as a Behavioral Neurology Fellow and transitioned to Assistant Professor in 2015. As a neurologist, Dr. Gardner evaluates and treats patients with various neurodegenerative disorders and provides them with follow-up care.

Her research program focuses on understanding the epidemiology and mechanisms of neurobehavioral and neurodegenerative sequelae of traumatic brain injury in older adults with the goal of improving long-term outcomes in this vulnerable population. This work is supported by the National Institutes of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, the American Federation for Aging Research, and the Global Brain Health Institute.

Joy Lee

Clinic Coordinator

Joy Lee is a clinic coordinator for the Memory and Aging Center. She is a certified Phlebotomy Technician (2008), studied medical terminology and is a certified medical biller and coder (2009). She has five years of dental background at the UCSF School of Dentistry and over seven years of experience in administrative and clerical support. She would like to pursue her career in the Memory and Aging Center. And she loves to bake!

Carrie Cheung

Clinic Coordinator

Carrie, a San Francisco native, comes from a sales and public service background with over 10 years of management. She graduated from San Francisco State University with a creative writing degree and a minor in holistic health. She enjoys helping the public, learning new cultures and challenges, and writing about her experiences.

Dena Dubal, MD, PhD

Assistant Professor of Neurology

Dr. Dubal received her medical and doctorate degrees from the University of Kentucky College of Medicine. Her graduate research with Dr. Phyllis Wise focused on effects of hormones on stroke injury. Dr. Dubal completed a medical internship and neurology residency at UCSF, where she also served as chief resident. She then trained with Drs. Lennart Mucke and Bruce Miller, who shared the 2011 Potamkin Prize in Neurodegeneration. Dr. Dubal is an Assistant Professor of Neurology at UCSF and directs the Laboratory of Neuroscience and Aging research. Her laboratory's research focus is on how to slow or block aging to prevent diseases of the aging brain, such as Alzheimer's. She is a recipient of the Paul Beeson Career Development Award through the NIA and American Federation for Aging Research.

Information on Dr. Dubal's Laboratory for Neuroscience and Aging Research can be accessed at www.duballab.org.

Georges Naasan, MD

Neurologist, Clinical Instructor

Dr. Georges Naasan received his medical degree from the American University of Beirut in Lebanon. He completed an internship in medicine and a residency in neurology at Case Western Reserve University, University Hospitals of Cleveland. He joined the UCSF Memory and Aging Center in 2011 where he is a Clinical Instructor and a Behavioral Neurology Fellow.

As a neurologist, Dr. Naasan evaluates patients and research participants with various neurodegenerative disorders through a multidisciplinary approach and provides follow-up care. He is particularly interested in the psychotic manifestations of neurodegenerative diseases such as hallucinations and delusions. During his residency, he used functional MRI imaging techniques to study the anatomy of misidentification delusions such as the Capgras syndrome.

Alzheimer's Disease Trial with Crenezumab

The purpose of this study is to evaluate the efficacy and safety of crenezumab, an amyloid antibody, in patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease.

Summary

  • Study director: Adam Boxer, MD, PhD
  • Sponsor: Genentech, Inc.
  • Recruiting?: Closed to enrollment, but continuing follow-up
  • Official study title: A Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo Controlled, Parallel-Group, Multicenter, Phase II Study to Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of MABT5102A in Patients With Mild to Moderate Alzheimer's Disease (ABBY)

Alissa Nana Li, PhD

Postdoctoral Fellow

Alissa joined the Seeley Selective Vulnerability Research Laboratory in 2011 as a post-doctoral fellow. Her background is in neurodegeneration research. Alissa completed a BSc degree with honors in biomedical science in 2004 and a PhD degree in anatomy in 2009 from the University of Auckland, New Zealand, where she investigated the variable pattern of cortical neuronal loss in Huntington’s disease. In the Seeley lab she is investigating the selective vulnerability of von Economo neurons (VENs) in frontotemporal dementia.

Norbert Lee

Staff Research Associate

Norbert Lee joined Dr. Seeley's Selective Vulnerability Research Laboratory as a Staff Research Associate in 2010. He assists with brain banking and other histology technician functions.

David Perry, MD

Assistant Professor of Neurology

Dr. Perry graduated from medical school at Georgetown University in Washington, DC. He completed an internship in internal medicine and residency in neurology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota where he also researched obsessive-compulsive features in dementia. He is an Assistant Professor of Neurology at the Memory and Aging Center and participates in the evaluation and treatment of patients in the MAC clinic.

His current area of research interest is the impact of neurodegenerative illness on reward processing.

Jennifer S. Yokoyama, PhD

Assistant Professor

Jennifer Yokoyama obtained her doctorate degree in Pharmaceutical Sciences and Pharmacogenomics from UCSF in December 2010 with Dr. Steven Hamilton (Department of Psychiatry and Institute for Human Genetics). Her dissertation comprised work within the Canine Behavioral Genetics Project, utilizing pure bred dogs as genetic models for studying neuropsychiatric disease. Utilizing community-based canine DNA samples, Dr. Yokoyama performed genome-wide surveys for genetic loci underlying the canine anxiety disorder noise phobia, as well as for loci underlying adult-onset deafness in border collies.

Dr. Yokoyama is currently an Assistant Professor at the Memory and Aging Center, where she is beginning a research program in neurogenetics of aging. Specifically, she is interested in the effect genotype can have on brain physiology, behavior and cognition in healthy older adults, and how this is related to increased vulnerability to (or protection from) neurodegenerative processes during aging. She is also particularly interested in understanding these effects in diverse ethnic populations. Dr. Yokoyama's long-term goal is to understand how variation across the entire genome confers risk for particular types of neurodegeneration for purposes of early treatment and therapeutic intervention.

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