aging

healthy, normal aging

Joanna Hellmuth, MD, MHS

Behavioral Neurology Fellow

Joanna Hellmuth, MD, MHS, joined the UCSF Memory and Aging Center in July 2014 as a behavioral neurology fellow. She provides care to patients with various neurodegenerative disorders and collaborates in the evaluation of patients for the Alzheimer's Disease Research Center (ADRC) and frontotemporal dementia program project grant.

Julio C. Rojas, MD, PhD

Behavioral Neurology Fellow

Julio Rojas received his medical degree from the Tecnológico de Monterrey School of Medicine in Monterrey, Nuevo León, Mexico. He completed his doctoral studies in neuroscience at the University of Texas at Austin with a dissertation on Strategies of neuroprotection in an in vivo model of retinal degeneration induced by mitochondrial dysfunction. He completed neurology residency at UT Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas. In 2014, he joined the UCSF Memory and Aging Center where he is a behavioral neurology fellow. Dr. Rojas is part of the Clinical Trials team led by Dr. Adam Boxer in which he participates in patient evaluation and monitoring. He provides care to patients with various neurodegenerative disorders and collaborates in the evaluation of patients for the Alzheimer's Disease Research Center (ADRC), frontotemporal dementia program project grant and Rapidly Progressive Dementia Program. Dr. Rojas is interested in experimental neurotherapeutics, and his research focuses on biomarker development and cognitive enhancing interventions.

Noelle Ohanesian

Asst. Clinical Research Coordinator

Originally from upstate New York, Noelle graduated from Duke University in May 2014 with a Bachelor of Science degree in neuroscience and a history minor. While attending school, she worked as a research assistant in Duke's Center for Cognitive Neuroscience, running a study examining the effects of acute stress on memory retention. She also spent a summer working for the Behavioral Lab in the Duke University Fuqua School of Business studying social mimicry in anorexic subjects. Outside of her academic interests, she worked as the Program Director of Duke’s backpacking organization, Project WILD, in which she directed one- and two-week backpacking programs for the freshmen class. Noelle joined the UCSF Memory and Aging Center in June 2014 as a member of the clinical trials team under Dr. Adam Boxer. She is a research coordinator for the asymptomatic Alzheimer’s disease trial.

Caitlin Glennon

Analyst

Caitlin joined the Memory and Aging Center in March 2014. She is currently an analyst working on Dr. Boxer’s clinical trials and research studies. She previously worked in the Department of Neurology at UCSF with the Stroke Sciences Group on both industry and NIH-funded clinical trials.

Publications

A selection of the abstracts and manuscripts published using EXAMINER data.

The publications listed on this page are a selection of the articles published that used the EXAMINER battery. If you wish to look for more, you can search PubMED, which is maintained by the National Library of Medicine, or Google Scholar.

Manuscripts

  1. Kramer, J.H. (2014). Special Series Introduction: NIH EXAMINER and the Assessment of Executive Functioning. Journal of the International Psychological Society, 20(1), 8-10. doi: 10.1017/S1355617713001185

Panos Theofilas, PhD

Postdoctoral Scholar

Panos Theofilas joined the Grinberg lab at the UCSF Memory and Aging Center in 2012. His research focuses on the neuropathological changes and susceptibility of subcortical brain regions in the earliest stages of Alzheimer's disease. Dr. Theofilas’ methodology includes analyses of human brain circuitries as a whole by combining unbiased stereology, immunohistochemistry/biochemical assays, and 3D computer graphics for histological brain volume reconstructions. His academic background includes a BSc degree in zoology and an MSc degree in neuroscience from the University of Edinburgh, UK. He completed his PhD degree at Bonn University in Germany on programmed cell death signaling pathways in animal models of temporal lobe epilepsy.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Read through our list of commonly asked questions about using the NIH EXAMINER Test Battery.


General

Q: Are there norms for each individual subtest or just the composite scores? We are hoping to get age- or age-and-education-based norms.

Anesthesia

The risk of cognitive decline related to surgery and anesthesia continues to be debated in the scientific literature. Some animal studies suggest that anesthesia may worsen the development of the plaques and tangles associated with Alzheimer’s disease while others identify the surgical procedure itself to be a problem by causing inflammation and release of harmful proteins. Others attribute temporary or permanent cognitive changes to the medications used to manage pain or other complications of being hospitalized. Ultimately, although this is a very active area of research, there are no definitive studies in older humans that prove a causative effect on the brain from anesthesia or provide recommendations on specific choices of anesthesia. Despite this, we hope to be able to identify information that may help our patients with cognitive problems evaluate the risk and make informed choices about surgery and anesthesia.

The risk of cognitive decline related to surgery and anesthesia continues to be debated in the scientific literature. Some animal studies suggest that anesthesia may worsen the development of the plaques and tangles associated with Alzheimer’s disease while others identify the surgical procedure itself to be a problem by causing inflammation and release of harmful proteins. Others attribute temporary or permanent cognitive changes to the medications used to manage pain or other complications of being hospitalized.

Serggio Lanata, MD

Clinical Instructor and Behavioral Neurology Fellow

Dr. Serggio Lanata was raised in Peru, where he began his undergraduate studies in general science. He later earned a bachelor of science degree from the University of Florida. He obtained his medical degree from the University of South Florida, and then completed his medicine internship and neurology residency at Brown University. He joined the UCSF Memory and Aging Center in July 2013 as a Clinical Instructor and Behavioral Neurology Fellow. He evaluates and treats patients referred to the MAC clinic.

Currently, he is mostly interested in the phenotypic overlap that exists between behavioral variant FTD and different psychiatric disorders, and how our understanding of bvFTD can inform our knowledge of the pathophysiology that underlies specific psychiatric disorders.

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