ppa

primary progressive aphasia

Tips for Hospitalization

Hospitalization of a patient with dementia is a potentially stressful experience often associated with negative outcomes for both the patient and family. The “Partner With Me” (PWM) project was developed to educate and connect healthcare providers with family caregivers of our patients with memory impairment.

Hospitalization of a patient with dementia is a potentially stressful experience often associated with negative outcomes for both the patient and family. The majority of dementia care is provided in the home by family caregivers who have intimate knowledge about the patient’s preferences, schedule, communication and comprehension abilities. The "Partner With Me" (PWM) project was developed to educate and connect healthcare providers with family caregivers of our patients with memory impairment.

Eileen Pedersen

Clinical Coordinator

Eileen is a clinical coordinator for the UCSF Memory and Aging Center with a BA degree from Dominican University of California in English.

Alternative Treatments

Practitioners of complementary and alternative medicine (CAM) use health care practices and products that are not considered a part of the conventional medicine practiced by holders of MD (medical doctor), DO (doctor of osteopathy), nursing and therapy degrees. The list of treatments considered CAM evolves regularly as therapies that are proven to be safe and effective in clinical trials become mainstream health care. It is important to remember herbal and alternative treatments may interact with prescribed or non prescription medications, and as with all treatments, possess the potential for side effects.

Using herbal treatments

Herbs are typically used in combination with each other and usually do not have serious side effects when used appropriately at suggested doses. It is not unusual for an individual to use complementary medicine and conventional medicine at the same time.

The risks of herbal treatments

Reducing Cognitive Impairment after Surgery

Older patients with neurodegenerative disease quite often need surgery for reasons unrelated to their cognitive problems. Both the hospital and surgical environments can be challenging for patients, but with some planning, these difficulties can be minimized. The suggestions that follow are not all inclusive, and we suggest discussing suggestions your physician/s may have prior to any surgical procedure.

Older patients with neurodegenerative disease quite often need surgery for reasons unrelated to their cognitive problems. Both the hospital and surgical environments can be challenging for patients, but with some planning, these difficulties can be minimized. The suggestions that follow are not all inclusive, and we suggest discussing suggestions your physician/s may have prior to any surgical procedure.

Medications to Avoid

It is always good try to non-drug interventions before turning to medications but sometimes medications are necessary. Certain types of medications may actually increase confusion, and people with cognitive problems may be particularly sensitive to these effects. In addition, they may interfere with the medications used to treat cognitive problems.

It is always good try to non-drug interventions before turning to medications but sometimes medications are necessary. Certain types of medications may actually increase confusion, and people with cognitive problems may be particularly sensitive to these effects. In addition, they may interfere with the medications used to treat cognitive problems. Below is information about medications to try to avoid if you have cognitive problems.

Anxiety

What medications are commonly used for anxiety?

Raquel C. Gardner, MD

Assistant Professor

Dr. Gardner completed her bachelor's degree in neuroscience and behavior at Columbia University in New York. She received her medical degree from Harvard University. She completed her internship in internal medicine and residency in neurology at UCSF. She then joined the UCSF Memory and Aging Center in 2012 as a Behavioral Neurology Fellow and transitioned to Assistant Professor in 2015. As a neurologist, Dr. Gardner evaluates and treats patients with various neurodegenerative disorders and provides them with follow-up care.

Her research program focuses on understanding the epidemiology and mechanisms of neurobehavioral and neurodegenerative sequelae of traumatic brain injury in older adults with the goal of improving long-term outcomes in this vulnerable population. This work is supported by the National Institutes of Neurological Disorders and Stroke, the American Federation for Aging Research, and the Global Brain Health Institute.

Joy Lee

Clinic Coordinator

Joy Lee is a clinic coordinator for the Memory and Aging Center. She is a certified Phlebotomy Technician (2008), studied medical terminology and is a certified medical biller and coder (2009). She has five years of dental background at the UCSF School of Dentistry and over seven years of experience in administrative and clerical support. She would like to pursue her career in the Memory and Aging Center. And she loves to bake!

Carrie Cheung

Clinic Coordinator

Carrie, a San Francisco native, comes from a sales and public service background with over 10 years of management. She graduated from San Francisco State University with a creative writing degree and a minor in holistic health. She enjoys helping the public, learning new cultures and challenges, and writing about her experiences.

Dena Dubal, MD, PhD

Assistant Professor of Neurology

Dr. Dubal received her medical and doctorate degrees from the University of Kentucky College of Medicine. Her graduate research with Dr. Phyllis Wise focused on effects of hormones on stroke injury. Dr. Dubal completed a medical internship and neurology residency at UCSF, where she also served as chief resident. She then trained with Drs. Lennart Mucke and Bruce Miller, who shared the 2011 Potamkin Prize in Neurodegeneration. Dr. Dubal is an Assistant Professor of Neurology at UCSF and directs the Laboratory of Neuroscience and Aging research. Her laboratory's research focus is on how to slow or block aging to prevent diseases of the aging brain, such as Alzheimer's. She is a recipient of the Paul Beeson Career Development Award through the NIA and American Federation for Aging Research.

Information on Dr. Dubal's Laboratory for Neuroscience and Aging Research can be accessed at www.duballab.org.

Syndicate content