ppa

primary progressive aphasia

Glossary of Medical Terms

This list defines many of the words or terms you will hear when discussing neurodegenerative disease.

  • agnosia: A loss of the ability to recognize objects, persons, sounds, shapes or smells without injury to the primary sensory organ or memory loss
  • agrammatism: The presence of grammatical errors in speech, such as the omission or incorrect usage of articles (“cow jumped over moon”), prepositions (“dog walk bridge”) or verbs (“cat eated mouse”).

Anna M. Karydas

Biospecimen/Genetics Programs Manager

Anna Karydas is the Biospecimen/Genetics Programs Manager at the Memory and Aging Center. She serves as primary subject expert for the acquisition, characterization and management of biological materials. Karydas works directly with the clinical staff, including nurses and genetic counselors, to ensure accurate and efficient collection, delivery and reconciliation of biologic materials.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Before you or your loved one join a research trial or study, your doctor should talk to you about what it's like to be in a trial and describe the pros and cons of participating. If you are interested, someone from the clinical trial staff will explain the details of the study, risks and benefits, and your rights as a participant, including your right to withdraw from the study at any point. Once all your questions have been answered, they will ask you to sign an informed consent to participate.

Choosing to participate in a clinical trial or research study is an important personal decision. The following frequently asked questions (FAQ) provide detailed information about clinical trials and were modified from the NIH Clinical Trials website, the UCSF Human Subjects Protection Program Website and the National Institute on Aging Alzheimer’s Disease website.

Anne Theresa Adams

Though interested in drawing and painting from an early age, much of Anne Adams' adult life was spent in left-brain activities. Obtaining a PhD degree in cell biology from UBC in 1982, Anne held teaching and research positions until one of her children was seriously injured in a car accident late in 1986. Thinking he would need years of specialized care, she gave up academia and decided to take up painting as a full time career. As it turned out, her son made a miraculous recovery within two months, but Anne resolved to continue with her art.

Though interested in drawing and painting from an early age, much of Anne Adams' adult life was spent in left-brain activities. Born in Toronto in 1940, she graduated with an Honors BSc in Physics and Chemistry from the University of Toronto in 1962 and taught at that institution for a couple of years until her first child with husband Robert was born in 1964. The family moved to Vancouver in 1966 where Robert became a Professor of Mathematics at the University of British Columbia.

Director's Interest

An integral component of the Memory and Aging Center’s research mission is to understand various complex functions of the brain. As such, many individuals at the Memory and Aging Center are fascinated by the creative brain and hope to gain a greater understanding of the creative mind.

“Creativity is our species’ natural response
to the challenges of human experience.”
~ Adriana Diaz

Neuroscience research in the past several decades has increased the understanding of human brain functions particularly emotion, perception, and behavior. An integral component of the Memory and Aging Center’s research mission is to understand various complex functions of the brain. As such, many individuals at the Memory and Aging Center are fascinated by the creative brain and hope to gain a greater understanding of the creative mind.

Emotions

Emotional and behavioral symptoms are common in dementia and can be major sources of stress to patients and their caregivers.

Emotional and behavioral symptoms are common in dementia and can be major sources of stress to patients and their caregivers. Some of the most common emotional and behavioral changes associated with dementia are:

  • Apathy and Indifference—lack of motivation to start new activities and continue old ones, reduced participation in household chores, loss of interest in talking to other people, becoming less affectionate and emotionally expressive.

Impact of Neurological Illness

Speech and language difficulty commonly affects individuals with dementia and other neurological conditions. Patients may experience deficits in the form of verbal expression (i.e., word-finding difficulty) or comprehension (i.e., difficulty understanding speech).

Alzheimer’s disease (AD)

Disorders of Speech & Language

Aphasia is the term used to describe an acquired loss of language that causes problems with any or all of the following: speaking, listening, reading and writing.

Aphasia is the term used to describe an acquired loss of language that causes problems with any or all of the following: speaking, listening, reading and writing. Some people with aphasia have trouble using words and sentences (expressive aphasia). Some have problems understanding others (receptive aphasia). Others with aphasia struggle with both using words and understanding (global aphasia). Aphasia can cause problems with spoken language (talking and understanding) and written language (reading and writing).

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