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Medications to Avoid

It is always good try to non-drug interventions before turning to medications but sometimes medications are necessary. Certain types of medications may actually increase confusion, and people with cognitive problems may be particularly sensitive to these effects. In addition, they may interfere with the medications used to treat cognitive problems.

It is always good try to non-drug interventions before turning to medications but sometimes medications are necessary. Certain types of medications may actually increase confusion, and people with cognitive problems may be particularly sensitive to these effects. In addition, they may interfere with the medications used to treat cognitive problems. Below is information about medications to try to avoid if you have cognitive problems.

Anxiety

What medications are commonly used for anxiety?

Raquel Gardner, MD

Clinical Instructor and Behavioral Neurology Fellow

Dr. Gardner completed her BA degree in Neuroscience and Behavior at Columbia University in New York. She received her medical degree from Harvard University. She completed her inernship in internal medicine and residency in neurology at UCSF. She then joined the UCSF Memory and Aging Center in 2012 where she is a Clinical Instructor and a Behavioral Neurology Fellow. As a neurologist, Dr. Gardner evaluates and treats patients with various neurodegenerative disorders and provides them with follow-up care. Her current research focuses on understanding network degeneration in progressive supranuclear palsy using functional connectivity MRI.

Joy Lee

Clinic Coordinator

Joy Lee is a clinic coordinator for the Memory and Aging Center. She is a certified Phlebotomy Technician (2008), studied medical terminology and is a certified medical biller and coder (2009). She has five years of dental background at the UCSF School of Dentistry and over seven years of experience in administrative and clerical support. She would like to pursue her career in the Memory and Aging Center. And she loves to bake!

Carrie Cheung

Clinic Coordinator

Carrie, a San Francisco native, comes from a sales and public service background with over 10 years of management. She graduated from San Francisco State University with a creative writing degree and a minor in holistic health. She enjoys helping the public, learning new cultures and challenges, and writing about her experiences.

Georges Naasan, MD

Neurologist, Clinical Instructor

Dr. Georges Naasan received his medical degree from the American University of Beirut in Lebanon. He completed an internship in medicine and a residency in neurology at Case Western Reserve University, University Hospitals of Cleveland. He joined the UCSF Memory and Aging Center in 2011 where he is a Clinical Instructor and a Behavioral Neurology Fellow.

As a neurologist, Dr. Naasan evaluates patients and research participants with various neurodegenerative disorders through a multidisciplinary approach and provides follow-up care. He is particularly interested in the psychotic manifestations of neurodegenerative diseases such as hallucinations and delusions. During his residency, he used functional MRI imaging techniques to study the anatomy of misidentification delusions such as the Capgras syndrome.

Andrew Trujillo

Research Associate

Andrew joined the Seeley Selective Vulnerability Research Laboratory in June 2011 as an Imaging Research Associate. He graduated from Pomona College in 2009 with a bachelor of arts degree in cognitive science. Andrew comes to the UCSF Memory and Aging Center (MAC) after having completed a two year apprenticeship at Stanford University where he worked on neuroimaging projects related to reward processing. Andrew assists with fMRI data collection and analysis across multiple projects including the Autonomics study.

Alissa Nana Li, PhD

Postdoctoral Fellow

Alissa joined the Seeley Selective Vulnerability Research Laboratory in 2011 as a post-doctoral fellow. Her background is in neurodegeneration research. Alissa completed a BSc degree with honors in biomedical science in 2004 and a PhD degree in anatomy in 2009 from the University of Auckland, New Zealand, where she investigated the variable pattern of cortical neuronal loss in Huntington’s disease. In the Seeley lab she is investigating the selective vulnerability of von Economo neurons (VENs) in frontotemporal dementia.

Norbert Lee

Staff Research Associate

Norbert Lee joined Dr. Seeley's Selective Vulnerability Research Laboratory as a Staff Research Associate in 2010. He assists with brain banking and other histology technician functions.

David Perry, MD

Neurology Fellow

Dr. Perry graduated from medical school at Georgetown University in Washington, DC. He completed an internship in internal medicine and residency in neurology at the Mayo Clinic in Rochester, Minnesota where he also researched obsessive-compulsive features in dementia. He is a clinical instructor and fellow in behavioral neurology at the Memory and Aging Center and participates in the evaluation and treatment of patients in the MAC clinic.

His current area of research interest is the impact of neurodegenerative illness on reward processing.

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