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Alzheimer’s Disease Trial with Aducanumab

The primary purpose of this study is to find out whether aducanumab has the potential to be a helpful treatment that slows down disease progression in subjects with early Alzheimer’s disease (AD) by comparing it to placebo and to evaluate its safety (side effects), and to find out more about aducanumab.

Summary

  • Study director: Adam Boxer, MD, PhD
  • Sponsor: Biogen
  • Recruiting?: Yes
  • Official study title: A Phase 3 Multicenter, Randomized, Double-Blind, Placebo-Controlled, Parallel-Group Study to Evaluate the Efficacy and Safety of Aducanumab (BIIB037) in Subjects with Early Alzheimer's Disease

Gallery 190

The Memory and Aging Center has met individuals who never created art before becoming ill and are now making wonderful, intriguing artwork in the face of their illness. When the MAC moved to the UCSF Mission Bay Campus in 2012, we immediately imagined art hanging in the beautiful reception area of Suite 190.

Gallery 190, sponsored by the UCSF Memory and Aging Center (MAC), is located in the Sandler Neurosciences Building on the Mission Bay Campus of the University of California, San Francisco (UCSF).

Publications

A selection of the abstracts and manuscripts published using EXAMINER data.

The publications listed on this page are a selection of the articles published that used the EXAMINER battery. If you wish to look for more, you can search PubMED, which is maintained by the National Library of Medicine, or Google Scholar.

Manuscripts

  1. Kramer, J.H. (2014). Special Series Introduction: NIH EXAMINER and the Assessment of Executive Functioning. Journal of the International Psychological Society, 20(1), 8-10. doi: 10.1017/S1355617713001185

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

Read through our list of commonly asked questions about using the NIH EXAMINER Test Battery.


General

Q: Are there norms for each individual subtest or just the composite scores? We are hoping to get age- or age-and-education-based norms.

Anesthesia

The risk of cognitive decline related to surgery and anesthesia continues to be debated in the scientific literature. Some animal studies suggest that anesthesia may worsen the development of the plaques and tangles associated with Alzheimer’s disease while others identify the surgical procedure itself to be a problem by causing inflammation and release of harmful proteins. Others attribute temporary or permanent cognitive changes to the medications used to manage pain or other complications of being hospitalized. Ultimately, although this is a very active area of research, there are no definitive studies in older humans that prove a causative effect on the brain from anesthesia or provide recommendations on specific choices of anesthesia. Despite this, we hope to be able to identify information that may help our patients with cognitive problems evaluate the risk and make informed choices about surgery and anesthesia.

The risk of cognitive decline related to surgery and anesthesia continues to be debated in the scientific literature. Some animal studies suggest that anesthesia may worsen the development of the plaques and tangles associated with Alzheimer’s disease while others identify the surgical procedure itself to be a problem by causing inflammation and release of harmful proteins. Others attribute temporary or permanent cognitive changes to the medications used to manage pain or other complications of being hospitalized.

UCSF Over 80 Clinic

The staff of the UCSF Over 80 Clinic seek to address the complex dementia care issues commonly seen when caring for the oldest old. This care often requires an in-depth understanding of co-existing non-dementia medical illnesses, medication interactions, and the integrated living environment encountered in care of elders.

The staff of the UCSF Over 80 Clinic seek to address the complex dementia care issues commonly seen when caring for the oldest old. This care often requires an in-depth understanding of co-existing non-dementia medical illnesses, medication interactions, and the integrated living environment encountered in care of elders. In contrast to the clinical priorities for younger patients with cognitive decline, diagnosis is often only a small factor in maximizing outcomes.

Make a Referral

Thank you for considering a referral to the UCSF Memory and Aging Center. We appreciate the opportunity to provide consultation services to you and your patients. The clinical services at the Memory and Aging Center are focused on providing a diagnostic evaluation and treatment recommendations for neurodegenerative diseases. This includes diagnoses such as Alzheimer’s disease, vascular dementia and dementia with Lewy bodies as well as less common disorders such as frontotemporal dementia, Huntington’s disease and Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease. We also have a specialty clinic for patients with cognitive complaints that may be associated with movement disorders or genetic conditions. If you have questions about the process or would like to speak with someone about a referral, please call 415-353-2057.

Thank you for considering a referral to the UCSF Memory and Aging Center. We appreciate the opportunity to provide consultation services to you and your patients. The clinical services at the Memory and Aging Center are focused on providing a diagnostic evaluation and treatment recommendations for neurodegenerative diseases.

Contact Us

For more information about the Neurodegenerative Disease Brain Bank (NDBB) and its tissue sharing procedure, please contact the administrative manager. For questions about the Autopsy Program, please contact the autopsy coordinator.

For more information about the Neurodegenerative Disease Brain Bank (NDBB) and its tissue sharing procedure, please contact the administrative manager at 415.502.7459.

For questions about the Autopsy Program, please contact the autopsy coordinator at 415.476.1681 or autopsy@memory.ucsf.edu.

Neurodegenerative Disease Brain Bank (NDBB) Director
William Seeley, MD
Associate Professor of Neurology
UCSF Memory and Aging Center
415.476.2793
Bill.Seeley@ucsf.edu

What We're Learning

Many new discoveries have been published in peer-reviewed papers using data from the Neurodegenerative Disease Brain Bank (NDBB).

Recent publications using data from the Neurodegenerative Disease Brain Bank (NDBB) include:

  1. Boxer AL, Garbutt S, Seeley WW, Jafari A, Heuer HW, Mirsky J, Hellmuth J, Trojanowski JQ, Huang E, Dearmond S, Neuhaus J, Miller BL. Saccade abnormalities in autopsy-confirmed frontotemporal lobar degeneration and Alzheimer disease. Arch Neurol. 2012;69:509-17.
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