mac

Main Site "Silo"

Anna M. Karydas

Biospecimen/Genetics Programs Manager

Anna Karydas is the Biospecimen/Genetics Programs Manager at the Memory and Aging Center. She serves as primary subject expert for the acquisition, characterization and management of biological materials. Karydas works directly with the clinical staff, including nurses and genetic counselors, to ensure accurate and efficient collection, delivery and reconciliation of biologic materials.

Memory and Aging Center hosts visiting artist program

video: 
See video

Marian Tse

Research Coordinator

Marian Tse joined the Memory and Aging Center in 2006 as a clinical research coordinator. Her primary role is administering cognitive tests to Chinese patients at different outreach sites and in the MAC clinic. Prior to joining the MAC, she worked for various research labs at UCSF.

In her free time, Marian enjoys hiking, cooking and singing.

謝譚敏兒
臨床實驗研究員

謝女士於二零零六年加入記憶力研究及治療中心,擔任臨床實驗研究員一職 。其主要職責是替華裔病人作記憶力測試;並將評估結果呈交本中心之神經專科医生作綜合評估病症之用 。與此同時,她更負責為病人、家屬或看顧者作即時傳譯,使我們的專科医生能對病人之病徵作深入了解。她是本中心與各外展診所 及病人之聯絡橋樑。工餘之時,謝女士喜歡遠足,烹飪及唱歌。

Kristine Yaffe, MD

Professor of Psychiatry, Neurology and Epidemiology

Dr. Kristine Yaffe attended Yale University for her undergraduate degree, received her medical degree at the University of Pennsylvania, and completed residencies in neurology and psychiatry at the University of California, San Francisco. She is a Professor of Psychiatry, Neurology and Epidemiology, the Roy and Marie Scola Endowed Chair and Vice Chair of Research in Psychiatry at UCSF. She is also the Chief of Geriatric Psychiatry and Director of the Memory Evaluation Clinic at the San Francisco Veterans Affairs Medical Center. In her research, clinical work, and mentoring, she has directed her efforts towards improving the care of patients with cognitive disorders and other geriatric neuropsychiatric conditions.

Dr. Yaffe serves on the Beeson Scientific Advisory Committee, the Council of the German Center for Neurodegenerative Diseases, and Alzheimer's Association Medical & Scientific Advisory Council. She is also the Co-Chair of the Institute of Medicine’s Committee on the Public Health Dimensions of Cognitive Aging. As the current principal investigator of eight NIH grants as well as several other DOD and foundation grants, Dr. Yaffe's research focuses on the epidemiology of cognitive aging and late life depression. In addition to publishing over 350 peer-reviewed articles (H-index=85) in numerous prestigious journals including the Lancet, BMJ, JAMA, and NEJM, Dr. Yaffe also edited a book published by Oxford Press, Chronic Medical Disease and Cognitive Aging: Toward a Healthy Body and Brain. In 2014, she was recognized as one of Thomas Reuters World’s Most Influential Scientific Minds and honored by the American Association for Geriatric Psychiatry with the Distinguished Scientist Award.

Victor Valcour, MD, PhD

Professor of Neurology

Dr. Valcour is an internist and geriatrician at the Memory and Aging Center at UCSF where he is an Associate Professor of Geriatric Medicine and Neurology. He has completed fellowships in both geriatric medicine and neurobehavior. He completed his medical training at the University of Vermont where he was elected to the Alpha Omega Alpha Medical Honors Society. He completed internal medicine residency at St. Joseph Hospital in Denver, Colorado, geriatric medicine fellowship at the University of Hawaii, and a neurobehavioral fellowship at UCSF. He worked as Associate Professor of Geriatric Medicine at the University of Hawaii-Manoa before joining the Memory and Aging Center at UCSF.

Dr. Valcour’s main research interest is neurocognition in aging HIV patients. He also completes neuroAIDS research in Bangkok, Thailand. He directed the Hawaii Aging with HIV Cohort of HIV-infected individuals over 50 years of age prior to joining the MAC. This leading HIV-aging neuroAIDS study began to unravel the neuro-epidemiology of aging with HIV. His current work at UCSF focuses on HIV patients over 60 years of age where he is recruiting individuals for a longitudinal cohort study. Nearly half of his research occurs in Bangkok, Thailand in association with the Southeast Asia Research Collaboration with Hawaii (SEARCH). Here his primary work relates to HIV DNA as a marker for dementia.

Valcour Lab website

William Seeley, MD

Professor of Neurology

Dr. Seeley attended medical school at the University of California at San Francisco (UCSF), where he first encountered patients with frontotemporal dementia (FTD) in 1999, during a research elective with Dr. Bruce Miller. He then completed a neurology residency at Harvard Medical School, training at the Massachusetts General and Brigham & Women's Hospitals. Returning to UCSF for a behavioral neurology fellowship, with Dr. Miller, Dr. Seeley developed expertise in the differential diagnosis and treatment of patients with neurodegenerative disease. He is currently a Professor of Neurology at the UCSF Memory and Aging Center, where he participates in patient evaluation and management.

Dr. Seeley’s research in his Selective Vulnerability Research Laboratory concerns regional vulnerability in dementia, that is, why particular dementias target specific neuronal populations. Dr. Seeley addresses this question through behavioral, functional imaging and neuropathology studies. The goal of his research is to determine what makes brain tissues susceptible or resistant to degeneration, with an eye toward ultimately translating these findings into novel treatment approaches.

Howard Rosen, MD

Professor of Neurology

Dr. Howard Rosen is a behavioral neurologist with more than 17 years of experience in the research and clinical care of neurodegenerative diseases. He was one of the core faculty members that established the UCSF Memory and Aging Center (MAC) in 1999 and has continued to play a central role in the MAC’s growth. He is the Associate Director of the federally funded Alzheimer’s Disease Research Center at UCSF and is Director of the California State Alzheimer’s Disease Center at UCSF. Dr. Rosen’s research has focused on the characterization of frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD), which presents with changes in social, emotional and language functions. He was an early adopter of unbiased whole brain analysis of gray matter atrophy, such as voxel morphometry for neurodegenerative disease. His work helped to establish the specificity of atrophy patterns in FTLD, highlighting the involvement of medial and orbital frontal regions and insula in this disorder, and linking changes in this system to specific behavioral abnormalities seen in patients. In addition, Dr. Rosen has used methods from emotions research to characterize the emotional deficit in FTLD, showing that FTLD patients have difficulty understanding others’ emotions, and more recently examining the role of impaired emotional processing in causing impaired self-awareness in FTLD.

Over the last few years, most of Dr. Rosen’s work has focused on developing new imaging-based measures for disease progression in FTLD, including both symptomatic groups of patients and those at high risk for developing FTLD because of autosomal dominant mutations. He led a recently completed multi-center study of FTLD that examined how the disease changes over time using multiple types of brain imaging, PET and multiple types of MRI, in order to compare the potential value of these different techniques for following progression and to link them to clinical changes occurring over time. Currently, he is co-leading two multi-center efforts to study members of families affected by FTLD longitudinally, using multimodal imaging in order to understand the effects of mutations on cognitive and behavioral function, as well as brain imaging both before and after overt symptoms of impairment appear. These studies are designed to improve our ability to develop treatments that would ameliorate or delay the onset of FTLD, and the lessons learned from these studies will be valuable for understanding the early evolution of neurodegenerative disease in many contexts. Furthermore, Dr. Rosen has a strong commitment to mentoring and education. He is director of the UCSF Behavioral Neurology Training Program and has mentored nearly 50 pre- and post-doctoral trainees, most of whom have contributed to publications and many of whom have gone on to become independent researchers.

Photo by Elisabeth Fall

Gil Rabinovici, MD

Associate Professor of Neurology

Born and raised in Jerusalem, Dr. Rabinovici received his BS degree from Stanford University and MD from Northwestern University Medical School. He completed an internship in internal medicine at Stanford University, neurology residency (and chief residency) at UCSF and a behavioral neurology fellowship at the Memory and Aging Center (MAC).

Dr. Rabinovici participates in patient evaluations and management. On the research front, he leads the MAC PET imaging program and is principle investigator of a cohort study of early-onset Alzheimer’s disease and of Imaging Dementia: Evidence for Amyloid Scanning (IDEAS), a national study sponsored by the Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services to assess the clinical utility of amyloid PET launching in 2016. His work investigates how structural, functional and molecular brain imaging techniques can be used to improve diagnostic accuracy in dementia and to study the biology of neurodegenerative diseases, with the goal of accelerating treatment development. Dr. Rabinovici’s work is supported by the National Institutes of Health (NIA and NINDS), the Alzheimer’s Association, the American College of Radiology, the John Douglas French Alzheimer's Foundation, the Tau Consortium, the Association for Frontotemporal Lobar Degeneration and Avid radiopharmaceuticals/Eli Lilly. Awards recognizing his work include the 2015 Christopher Clark Award for Advancement of the Field of Amyloid Imaging, the 2012 American Academy of Neurology Research Award in Geriatric Neurology and the 2010 Best Paper in Alzheimer’s Disease Neuroimaging: New Investigator Award from the Alzheimer’s Association.

Suzee Lee, MD

Assistant Professor of Neurology

Dr. Lee received a BA degree in English from Harvard and an MD degree from McGill University in Montreal, Canada. She then completed an internal medicine internship at Brown University and neurology residency at Mount Sinai Hospital in New York City, serving as Chief Resident in her final year. Dr. Lee completed a behavioral neurology fellowship at the UCSF Memory and Aging Center. She is a neurologist who evaluates and treats patients at the Memory and Aging Center.

Dr. Lee's research focuses on neuroimaging in atypical dementias, such as corticobasal degeneration and frontotemporal dementia. Her interests also include understanding genetic susceptibility in atypical dementias.

Syndicate content