People

Michael Geschwind, MD, PhD

Professor

Dr. Geschwind received his MD and PhD degrees in neuroscience through the National Institutes of Health (NIH)-sponsored Medical Scientist Training Program (MSTP) at the Albert Einstein College of Medicine in New York. He completed his internship in internal medicine at the University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) Medical Center, his neurology residency at the Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine in Baltimore and his fellowship in behavioral neurology at the UCSF Memory and Aging Center (MAC). He is a Professor of Neurology at the MAC.

Jacqueline Geyfen

Clinical Research Coordinator

Jackie is an assistant clinical research coordinator in the UCSF Clinical Affective Neuroscience Lab.

Julia Glueck

Clinical Research Coordinator

Julia Glueck is a clinical research coordinator working on the Huntington’s disease (HD) and spinocerebellar ataxia (SCA) programs led by Michael Geschwind, MD, PhD.

Matthew Goh

Research Data Analyst

Matthew builds prognostic models using magnetic resonance imaging data to show brain atrophy patterns in patients with frontotemporal lobar degeneration (FTLD). He develops, maintains and improves end-to-end neuroimage processing pipelines to transform raw MRI scans into actionable feature vectors for machine learning models.

Apraham Gomez

Practice Coordinator

Apraham is a practice coordinator for the UCSF Memory and Aging Center Clinic.

Yasmeen Gonzalez

Clinic Practice Manager

Collette Goode

Clinical Research Coordinator

Collette coordinates the Brain Health Assessment study, led by Dr. Kate Possin, which aims to develop a set of cognitive tests to detect mild neurocognitive disorders in older adults of varying medical, cultural and educational backgrounds. She also works closely with primary clinics implementing the Brain Health Assessment in their practice and with Dr. Kate Possin and Dr.

Andrea Gorham Vargas

Assistant Clinical Research Coordinator

Andrea graduated from Cornell University in May 2022 with a major in Biology & Society and a minor in Latin American Studies. She joined the MAC in June 2022 as an assistant research coordinator in the Dementia Imaging Genetics Lab, coordinating a study that aims to identify how early-disease-specific neural circuit differences develop in children carrying mutations causing frontotemporal dementia and Alzheimer’s disease.

Marilu Gorno Tempini, MD, PhD

Professor of Neurology and Psychiatry

Dr. Maria Luisa Gorno Tempini is a behavioral neurologist and holds the Charles Schwab Charles Schwab Distinguished Professorship in Dyslexia and Neurodevelopment. She currently directs the Language Neurobiology Laboratory at the UCSF Memory and Aging Center and co-directs the UCSF Dyslexia Center. She obtained her medical degree and clinical neurology specialty training in Italy and has a doctorate in the neuroimaging of language from University College London.

Harli Grant

Program Manager

Harli manages the NIH-funded Alzheimer's Disease Research Center and the New Approaches to Dementia Heterogeneity project, an NIH funded research program.

Lea Grinberg, MD, PhD

Professor

Dr. Lea Tenenholz Grinberg is a neuropathologist specializing in brain aging and associated disorders, most notably, Alzheimer’s disease and the neurological basis of sleep disturbances in neurodegenerative diseases. Currently, she is a John Douglas French Alzheimer’s Foundation Endowed Professor at the UCSF Memory and Aging Center, part of the Executive Board of the Global Brain Health Institute and a member of the Medical Scientific Advisory Group for the Alzheimer’s Association.

Erica Gutmann, MS, SLP

Research Speech-Language Pathologist

Erica is a pediatric speech-language pathologist in the UCSF Dyslexia Center. She has a BS degree in Human Development from UC Davis and an MS degree in Speech-Language Pathology from Boston University. Erica has worked with students with language-based learning disorders in both outpatient and school settings. Her research interests in developmental language and reading disorders are at the intersection of neurocognition, education, and clinical practice.

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